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This is the Medellín official Guide by Víztaz and the Medellín Mayor's Office

Gastronomy · Traditional Cuisine

Our ‘recipe’ includes a trip through plazas, marketplaces, and neighborhoods. Bandeja Paisa, typical of our territory, includes 15 ingredients and has become the main course. The menu has grown to include fish dishes -originating in coastal areas-, soups, froths, and exotic fruit, empanadas, arepas de huevo, and patacones –from coastal area cuisine-. Popular cuisine is also savored in area marketplaces: Plaza Minorista, Plaza de Mercado La América, Placita de Flórez and Mercado Arví, as well as at Farmer’s Markets.

» Empanadas
Empanadas

You find them large, medium, and small. The filling can be of shredded beef or ground beef. Large empanadas are the people’s favorite, because with a little hot sauce and a soft drink they make for a savory lunch for many. Other fried products are also favored.

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» Chicharrón
Chicharrón

Of the entire pig meat offer, Chicharrón is the most widely consumed in Medellín. Large, small, dry, greasy, crunchy, with lemon, with arepa, with hot sauce, in pieces, to share… In other words: anyway it comes out, Chicharrón! Its majesty.

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» Hogao
Hogao

Of the entire pig meat offer, Chicharrón is the most widely consumed in Medellín. Large, small, dry, greasy, crunchy, with lemon, with arepa, with hot sauce, in pieces, to share… In other words: anyway it comes out, Chicharrón! Its majesty.

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» Frutas y dulces calados
Frutas y dulces calados

Guanábana, lulo, níspero and mango do not grow in the same garden, but you always see them together at fruit juice and fruit cocktail stands. Calado or candied fruit (cooked over a slow fire and thickened in panela) is a legacy from Spanish cuisine. Its secret lies with the syrup’s boiling temperature point. Most famed are: tomate de árbol, lemon, fig, guava, mamey, papayuela, and peach.

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» Bebidas: claro, mazamorra y guandolo
Bebidas: claro, mazamorra y guandolo

A trilogy of peasant beverages. The first two are complemented; the third has very characteristic ingredients. Claro is the water resulting from cooking corn; Mazamorra is Claro plus cooked corn kernels; Guandolo is panela water with sour orange juice.

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» Chorizo
Chorizo

There is no unique recipe. A Paisa’s passion for this little stuffed casing has no equal. Every town in Antioquia prides itself for having The recipe. In Medellín, arepa and chorizo combination is a culinary legend. And there are chorizos of all kinds and prices.

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» Cafés especiales
Cafés especiales

It is no secret that Colombia is a land of diversity and coffee is omnipresent everywhere a traveler goes. From north to south, east to west verdant coffee plantations announce that in every one of these particular regions one can discover a multiplicity of treasures: the specialty coffees of Colombia.

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» Calentao
Calentao

In Medellín, this name is given to a dish every Antioqueño diner loves to include in his breakfast fare. It consists of beans and rice and a spoonful of Hogao. You mix it all in a frying pan and eat with arepa.

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» Arepas blancas
Arepas blancas

The adjective ‘white’ comes from the color the corn acquires when it undergoes threshing. These arepas, flat and as big as an old long play record, are customarily eaten at breakfast. The size of the arepa allows other food to be stacked on top; the diner decides! You can also find Choclo and cheese arepas.

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» Parva
Parva

In Medellín, this word is synonymous of almost every kind of baked goods known to man. Parva can come in all shapes, sizes, and textures. It can be sweet or salty but it is as ubiquitous on an Antioqueño table as the sun is in the sky.